About

Matthew W. McCarter earned his B.S. in management from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah and received a Ph.D. in business administration from the College of Business at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

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    Matthew.McCarter@utsa.edu

Matthew W. McCarter earned his B.S. in management from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah and received a Ph.D. in business administration from the College of Business at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. He is associate professor of management at the College of Business at the University of Texas at San Antonio and a research affiliate at the Economic Science Institute. He is the recipient of the 2012 Ascendant Scholar Award of the Western Academy of Management. Prior to his arrival at Texas, he held the Wang–Fradkin Assistant Professorship in the Argyros School of Business and Economics at Chapman University (Chapman’s highest faculty research professorship award).

Matthew’s primary research interest is managerial decision making with a particular interest in social dilemmas and collaboration problems in organizational settings. Matthew bridges scholarly conversations by teaming with scholars across a variety of fields – e.g., organizational behavior, operations management, managerial economics, strategic management, experimental economics, quantitative psychology, social psychology, and geography – to study strategies that organizations may employ to increase effective decision making, trust, and pro-social behavior in a variety of business ventures; e.g., alliances, supply chains, public–private partnerships, work teams, and communities. His work on managerial decision making (with a particular focus on social dilemmas) provides remedies for a variety of resource management issues: such as avoiding blackouts with shared energy grids, encouraging international funding for green initiatives, and fostering voluntary cooperation to sustain environmental and organizational resources. His secondary research interest is how the notions of organizational and statistical significance are used in organizational behavior research and how these notions affect scholarship.

Matthew employs field survey, case study, archival data, simulations, and experimental research methods to capture a fuller picture of how managerial decisions can be effectively made and collective action achieved in organizational settings. He has published in a variety of scholarly outlets including Academy of Management Review, Organizational Behavior & Human Decision Processes, Journal of Operations Management, and Journal of Business Logistics.

Matthew currently resides in San Antonio,Texas with his wife, Miriam Ellis of Lehi, Utah, and their four children. He enjoys traveling, Scouting, Martial Arts, and chess.